Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

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Mourinho to Conte: Chelsea’s most recent financial statements revealed an incredible compensation deal for the Italian when he departed the club in 2018.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Maurizio Sarri was replaced by Roman Abramovich after the Italian coach guided the Blues to Premier League triumph in his first season, despite the fact that they also won the FA Cup.

Conte, on the other hand, battled the decision vehemently, resulting in Chelsea spending £26.2 million on the entire backroom staff as well as a slew of legal fees.

The papers state that “exceptional items in the present year of £26.2 million relate to changes in the men’s team management and coaching personnel, as well as accompanying legal expenditures.”

Chelsea’s dismissal policy has already cost the club an astonishing £90 million.

Biggest managerial payouts

And, in light of their colossal severance compensation for Conte, we decided to compile a list of the ten largest severance packages in football history.

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So buckle up and brace yourself for colossal payments that may or may not include a certain Jose Mourinho – as well as Chelsea – on more instances than you’d want to believe.

Antonio Conte – £26.2 million (Chelsea, 2018)

This is the example that sparked the creation of this list. Conte was furious over his dismissal from Chelsea, but he has two historic pieces of silverware and some additional cash in his wallet to soothe him.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Jose Mourinho – £19.6 million (Manchester United, 2018)

Given how far United has fallen under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer since this deal was made, you have to ask if the club simply poured nearly £20 million down the toilet.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Jose Mourinho – £18.0 million (Chelsea, 2007)

On the list, this is the oldest compensatory payment. Mourinho was definitely watchful enough over a decade ago to ensure Chelsea would have to pay a price for letting him go.

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Laurent Blanc – £17.0 million (Paris Saint-Germain, 2016)

The fact that PSG paid about €20 million to replace Blanc with Unai Emery, who then flattered to deceive at both the Parc des Princes and the Emirates Stadium, is comical.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Nuno Espirito Santo – £14.0 million (Tottenham, 2021)

As part of Santo’s severance settlement, Tottenham paid the remainder of Nuno’s contract, which totaled £14 million. Nuno was paid a staggering £1.4 million for each Premier League game he managed for the north London club.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Luis Felipe Scolari – £13.6 million (Chelsea, 2009)

Chelsea clearly dug themselves a contractual hole when they signed the World Cup champion, and evicting him for an interim rule under Guus Hiddink wasn’t the most cost-effective option they could have taken.

Mourinho to Conte: The ten most lucrative management contracts in football history

Fabio Capello – £13.4 million (Russia, 2015)

When this massive severance money is rubbing shoulders with some of the world’s wealthiest club clubs, you know Capello has landed a lucrative contract with the Russian FA.

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Fabio Capello

Mauricio Pochettino – £12.5 million (Tottenham Hotspur, 2019)

Speaking of Spurs, the most recent addition to this list demonstrates that even Daniel Levy, regarded as one of the sport’s most thrifty individuals, is willing to part with a dollar when he desires a change.

The huge cost of sacking Mauricio Pochettino

Andre Villas-Boas – £12.0 million (Chelsea, 2012)

Yes, it’s the same club, and it’s the same year. Villas-Boas’ time at Stamford Bridge was a complete fiasco, although he did earn himself an eight-figure salary and, eventually, the Tottenham Hotspur job as a result of his efforts.

Roberto Di Matteo – £10.7 million (Chelsea, 2012)

It’s understandable that Abramovich was hesitant to hire Di Matteo on a full-time basis, so it’s no surprise that he didn’t waste time or money when the results changed.

How Roberto di Matteo masterminded Chelsea's 2012 UCL

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