Adama Traore Of Wolverhampton Pledges A Part Of His Salary To Project Common Goal To Aid Fight Racism in Football

Spread the love

Adama Traore of Wolverhampton FC has joined the Common Goal social impact movement, contributing 1% of his salary to their anti-racism project.

Adama Traore Of Wolverhampton Pledges A Part Of His Salary To Project Common Goal To Aid Fight Racism in Football
Adama Traore Pledges Part Of Salary To Project Common Goal To Aid Fight Racism in Football

The programme, which aims to eliminate racism in football by providing thorough anti-racism training to the game’s decision-makers, began in the United States last year.

“All too often in football, racist deeds steal the limelight,” the 25-year-old Spain international remarked.

“If there’s one thing I’ve learned so far in my career, it’s that action, not hollow words, is what counts when it comes to making a difference.” It’s critical to me that I use my platform to contribute to the solution.

“I understand that my one percent won’t be enough to address this problem, and that my voice won’t be enough to end systematic racism.” But nothing will be able to stop us from making an impact if I can persuade others to join us in this fight.”

In 2017, a single player, Juan Mata of Manchester United and Spain, pledged one percent of his salary to a collective fund, launching Common Goal.

SEE ALSO

The Common Goal team now has over 200 professional players and managers from 45 different countries, including some of the biggest names in football.

By 2030, the long-term goal is to have a positive impact on 100 million young people.

Mata hopes Traore will serve as an example to other Premier League players.

Adama Traore Of Wolverhampton Pledges A Part Of His Salary To Project Common Goal To Aid Fight Racism in Football
Adama Traore Pledges A Part of Salary To Project Common Goal To Aid Fight Racism in Football

“It’s amazing to have another Premier League player join me, Kasper Schmeichel, and Jurgen Klopp in this developing squad of almost 200 professionals from all around the world,” Mata added.

“In England, there are so many great female players who are already members of Common Goal, and I hope that Adama’s decision to join the movement in order to take concrete action against racism will motivate other male Premier League teammates to do the same.”

“A 1% change is almost little, but together we can make a significant difference, and the moment to act is now.”

Fans may purchase a football for their 1 percent to be donated to social change projects at www.adidas.co.uk/balls to join adidas and Common Goal on the starting line.

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published.